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Game Transfer Phenomena is moving to a new home!

Moving from UK… I will miss many things from Nottingham, the city of Robin Hood! A colourful multicultural, breathing and living city! A city that I witnessed getting developed during the last couple of years.

I’m happy and proud when I look back at my time in Nottingham. During the last six years I gave the best of me and put Nottingham Trent University on the headlines all around the world with my research on Game Transfer Phenomena conducted as my PhD.

BBC TV and BBC Radio (e.g., Click, Digital Human), New Scientist, Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune, Discovery News, and I got even my research into the TV series CSI: Cyber

Seeing the possibilities rather than the limitations… My partner Anders made me realise this is how I navigate through life, during our final dinner in Nottingham… I’m grateful for the opportunities to grow professionally and mature personaimg_1245lly.

During the last years my life has revolved around the work I highlight below, mostly done as part of my doctoral research next to my PhD supervisor Professor Mark Griffiths at Nottingham Trent University.

I hope to visit my friends and colleagues in Nottingham at some point in the future… For now, it is time to move on and keep building the dreams on a new path.

University of Liège in Belgium here I come!

I´m looking forward to start a new phase in my research into GTP with my Marie Curie COFUND postdoc fellowship, co-funded by the University of Liège and the European Union.

Conferences:

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Media coverage:

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Main published articles:

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B. (2016). The Game Transfer Phenomena framework: Investigating altered perceptions, automatic mental processes and behaviors induced by virtual immersion. Proceedings of the 21st Annual Review of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine. Cypsy21. In press.

Ortiz de Gortari A. B., Oldfield B & Griffiths M. D (2016). An empirical examination of factors associated with Game Transfer Phenomena severity. Computers in Human Behavior, 64, 274-284

Ortiz de Gortari A. B., & Griffiths M. D. (2016). Prevalence and Characteristics of Game Transfer Phenomena: A Descriptive Survey Study. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 32(6), 470-480.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B (2015). What can Game Transfer Phenomena tell us about the impact of highly immersive gaming technologies? Proceedings of the Interactive Technologies and Games 2015 Conference Proceedings in IEEE xplore.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., Pontes, H. A., & Griffiths, M. D. (2015). The Game Transfer Phenomena Scale: An instrument for investigating the non-volitional effects of video game playing.Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., & Griffiths, M. D. (2015). Game Transfer Phenomena and its associated factors: An exploratory empirical online survey study. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, 195-202.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B & Griffiths, M. D (2015). Living the game. IGI Global editorial monthly news. http://www.igi-global.com/newsroom/archive/living-game/2223

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., & Griffiths, M. D. (2014). Auditory experiences in Game Transfer Phenomena: An empirical self-report study. International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning 4(1), 59-75.

Ortiz de Gortari, A., & Griffiths, M. (2014). Automatic Mental Processes, Automatic Actions and Behaviours in Game Transfer Phenomena: An Empirical Self-Report Study Using Online Forum Data. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 1-21.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., & Griffiths, M. D. (2014). Altered Visual Perception in Game Transfer Phenomena: An Empirical Self-Report Study. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 30(2), 95-105.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., & Griffiths, M. D. (2012). An Introduction to Game Transfer Phenomena in Video Game Playing. In J. I. Gackenbach (Ed.), Video Game Play and Consciousness. NY: Nova Publisher.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., & Griffiths, M. D. (2012). The Relevance of Game Transfer Phenomena When Addressing Problematic Gaming. Paper presented at the 17th annual CyberPsychology & CyberTherapy Conference, Brussels, Belgium.

Ortiz de Gortari, A. B., Aronsson, K., & Griffiths, M. D. (2011). Game Transfer Phenomena in video game playing: A qualitative interview study. International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning, 1(3), 15-33.

 

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What characterize those with severe Game Transfer Phenomena?

According to our previous study on Game Transfer Phenomena (GTP) (i.e., altered sensorial perceptions, automatic mental processes and involuntary behaviours with game content) we found that most gamers have experienced GTP.

97% of our self-selected sample reported that they had experienced GTP at some point of their life.

The more common GTP reported were: i) visualized or seen video game images with closed eyes, ii) heard music from the game when not playing, iii) wanted to use video game elements in real life contexts and iv) involuntarily said something with contents from the game.

It was unexpected to find such a high prevalence of GTP. Certainly, the findings raised numerous questions.

How could it be that we found such a large prevalence in a non-self-selected sample?, what would be the prevalence if GTP is framed in a particular time period rather than during gamers whole life?, what would be the prevalence in a pathological sample or with actual drug users?

In our sample the majority of the participants did not suffer from any medical conditions, neither had most ever consumed drugs or were under the influence of a substance (medicament or drug) when they experienced GTP.

Most of the questions I mentioned above cannot be answered with our current data; however, we could answer what characterize those gamers who experienced a severe level of GTP.

Comparative analysis between the mild, moderate and severe levels of GTP showed interesting results (n=2281).

The majority of the participants showed mild level of GTP (57.8%), then moderate level (35.6%), and least had severe level (6.6%).

The factors significantly associated with the severe level of GTP were the following:

  • being student
  • being aged 18 to 22 years
  • being a professional gamer
  • playing video games every day in sessions of 6 hours or longer
  • playing to escape from the real world
  • having a sleep disorder, mental disorder or reported dysfunctional gaming
  • having experienced distress or dysfunction due to GTP.

In addition, having used drugs and experienced flashbacks as side-effects of drug use were significantly less likely to be reported by those with mild level of GTP.

Moreover, in a regression analysis, predictors of severe GTP included:

  • positive appraisals of GTP
  • distress or dysfunction due to GTP
  • tendency to recall dreams.

In general, the findings suggest that those with a severe level of GTP share characteristics with profiles of gamers with dysfunctional gaming (e.g., problematic and/or addictive gaming).

To get the full picture and the interpretation of the findings you are welcome to check our study published in the Computer in Human Behaviour.

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